Archive for the ‘KZYX’ Tag

Our Need For Music   Leave a comment

October 1, 2018

     Listening and hearing are two different things. Hearing is more about perception, as in some driver’s car horn asserting a right of way in traffic, or a dog barking in the distance; the crowd at a football game or a food vendor hawking the best sandwich this side of anywhere. Listening is entirely different. It’s the idea that you give your awareness to the sound, taking notice, turning your head, paying attention; you begin a journey with comprehension and (hopefully) arrive at enjoyment. The difference between hearing and listening is why I ended up working in the music business for so many years.

     Once heard, a great song, a great recording is not forgotten. It isn’t the ear-worm of a bad (and likely annoying) advertising jingle, but rather an emotional connection to something that connects with and within us. Twenty years ago a group of neuroscientists (in Nature Neuroscience, 1999) posited that

“Music has an extraordinary ability to evoke powerful emotions. This ability is particularly intriguing because, unlike most other stimuli that evoke emotion, such as smell, taste or facial expression, music has no obvious intrinsic biological or survival value.”

     All that being said, I don’t need a neuroscientist to tell me when a great record is playing. My brain (and heart) tell me that in seconds, or even fractions of seconds.

     Art is personal. Accept, for the moment, that radio is always playing to an audience of one. Radio programmers are often taught to think and perform that way: talk on the radio as if you’re speaking to just one person. Whether the station has thousands, tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of listeners, the audience is always an audience of one: you, me, her, him. Even when two or three of us are trapped together in a car on California’s roads or highways, most of the time if one member of the group says “did you hear that”, the likely response from the other passengers is “huh? Hear what?” That’s why I love radio. It’s personal.

     Some six weeks ago I was returning to the Mendocino Coast from the San Francisco Bay area. As I got somewhere north of Marin County I pushed the button on my car radio for KRSH, The Krush. It’s a predominantly Americana station situated in the middle of one of the most famous wine-regions in the world: Napa and Sonoma counties. (Hence, KRSH crush, as in grapes.) The midday host was about to begin interviewing a recording artist, singer/songwriter, and as she introduced her guest I wasn’t certain I heard the name, but the interview was worth the listen. At some point she told her audience she wanted to play a cut from the new album by Stan, or Steve, or Stu. I wasn’t certain just what his name was, but when the music started I really didn’t care about his name. The track was “Forgiveness” and for the next 3 1/2 minutes I was all about this amazing song with haunting lyrics.

I got voices in my head
Get me up and out of bed
I’ve been busted and I’ve been burned
My heart is beating but you know it hurts
And I can tell you every name
But that will never change anything
I ain’t saying I’ll forget it
Or their wrongs will ever be right
We’re just talking about forgiveness
And how it gives you back your life.

     So simple. Whatever the hurt, forgive, and that forgiveness will give back to you, perhaps even your life. The bridge in the song reminds us (particularly those of us who’ve been married for more than a few years) that

I know it’s never easy
Being torn apart
Forgive to be forgiven,
It will open up your heart.

     As happens to many of us—I assume, because I know it happens to me—I couldn’t get enough of this song, this recording.  Arriving home in Mendocino County I immediately tried to figure out just who was this guy on the radio. StallSome internet surfing, including a look at the KRSH website and, voila!, I had his name: Stoll Vaughan. Like any music lover bordering-on-groupie, a couple of weeks later I had a phone conversation with Stoll.

     First, it’s pronounced “stall”, not “stole”. (Stoll is a family name.) He’s from Kentucky and now calls Los Angeles home. “Forgiveness” is not his first song, and The Conversation is not his first album. As the saying goes, this project was not his first rodeo. Stoll’s Kentucky origin didn’t surprise me, as all those years having traveled to and through Nashville (not to mention the film project I did with the Bluegrass Music Association some 20+ years ago) immersed me in conversations with the sounds of a rural and cosmopolitan mid-south gentleness. He’s had education at Michigan’s Interlochen Boarding High School—one of the single best possible schools for an arts-oriented teenager. The Conversation was recorded back near Stoll’s home turf, using studios in Indiana and Nashville, with help from players like Duane Betts (son of Allman Brothers alum Dickey Betts), and Devon Allman (son of the late Gregg Allman), producer Carl Broemel and others.

     Stoll’s album has more than one cut, by the way. There are 13 tracks offering a listening experience just under an hour. “Bear Witness” “Weatherman”, “Meet You In The Middle” confirm his authenticity as a solid songwriter. And happily, like I experienced in my days in the music industry, it only takes one track to get someone’s attention, and then, like a good deed done to you, you’re duty-bound to pass it on. We no longer have hundreds of Top-40 radio stations, helping break an artist. Today we have to help music along, by passing the knowledge in conversation, in email, and through social media. If you frequent a bar with live music, let the owner know about your discovery.  I’m passing “Forgiveness” on to you so that you can discover Stoll Vaughan for yourself. While you’re at it, take credit for his success too. Stoll won’t mind and neither will I.

     Before I let you go, I wanted to mention one other artist and album worth listening to. KZYX radio’s Audible Feast host Fred Wooley played a track that left me confused. I knew those lyrics. At least I thought I did. But something was “wrong”. The tempo? The singer? The instruments? And suddenly it all came exploding out of some hidden part of my Elise Title CRbrain. The song was “You Never Can Tell”, a classic Chuck Berry hit from the 1950s. You may recall that in the storyline, Monsieur and Madame end up getting married, because “you know you never can tell”. The tempo for this version was brought way back, and my friend Fred told us that the vocalist was Elise Legrow.  Who? I hadn’t heard of her either. Pity. Her new album, Playing Chess has nothing to do with the game of chess, but everything to do with the Chess Brothers, as in Leonard and Phil Chess and Chicago-based Chess Records. Legrow chose a list of songs from the Chess catalog including “Over The Mountain”, “Rescue Me”, “Who Do You Love”, and more.

     Beyond the Playing Chess album (and in particular “You Never Can Tell”) there’s another Legrow track I found; a much older track of hers—2012?—titled “No Good Woman”.

     Remember those neuroscientists I quoted earlier? While I understand their scientific foundation, I have to disagree with one of their conclusions: “. . . music has no obvious intrinsic biological or survival value.” Any rational human being with a pulse knows there is a biological need for music. At the very least, did these geniuses never hear about setting the mood?  And as for survival, the concept of “desert island discs” was created for specific treasured recordings, i.e. music. Those brainiacs may not believe music is necessary for our survival, but I wouldn’t want to get stranded somewhere without my iPod and its 10,000 of my favorite songs.  Besides, if I’m not alone on the island, how will I set the mood?

David Steffen

© 2018 David Steffen
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Jazzed Up and Ready To Go   Leave a comment

July 1, 2018

     I began to learn a little bit about jazz in the late 1960s visiting often with my late friend, jazz DJ Ron Cuzner. He usually broadcast from midnight to 6:00am on WFMR-fm in Milwaukee. Ron clearly knew his stuff and those conversations compelled me to listen outside my comfort zone.

 

     I remember walking, in the summer of 1967, into a record store on Chicago’s near north side. I was on my way to a club called the Earl of Old Town where I was to hear a local folkie perform. Everyone had heard about the recent death of John Coltrane, and as I browsed through the bins I picked up (and bought) a vinyl copy of Coltrane’s legendary 1964 recording , A Love Supreme. It was a touchstone for me in my appreciation of jazz.  I was not yet fully aware of the impact of Coltrane’s death. That would come later.

Jazz Covers CR

 

     Meanwhile, A Love Supreme, recorded by Coltrane’s “Classic Quartet”—McCoy Tyner, piano, Jimmy Garrison, bass, Elvin Jones, drums, and Coltrane, saxophone—was the centerpiece of three vinyl albums I purchased in the late ’60s. In addition to ‘Supreme, I
bought  Les McCann and Eddie Harris’ album Swiss Movement featuring “Compared To What”, and the album  Feeling Blue by Phil Upchurch. Happily I still have all three vinyl LPs.

 

     I met Quincy Jones in 1972 while working for A&M Records. Q, as others referred to him, was in Chicago to promote a new album and I was taking him to various radio stations and press interviews. Quincy was genial, talkative and yet, one sensed he was in a hurry, on a mission, as if there was too much music in his head and he wanted to make certain it all got out of there. I stayed in the music business for 25 years, but from those early introductions to jazz, my affection for the genre never faded.

 

     In 1996 I was hired by Universal Music to turn around a failing jazz label named GRP Records. The label hadn’t always been a business basket case, but in 1996 it was. It took almost two years to turn a profit, but we did. A side benefit for me was meeting and working with the likes of legendary players, like Horace Silver, Dr. John, and George Benson. One of my most memorable moments happened while in The Netherlands for the North Sea Jazz Festival. Meeting for dinner at a restaurant in The Hague (my memory tells me it was called “Roberts”.) More important than “where” was “who”. Seven of us spent the evening socializing, but more importantly I found myself sandwiched between producer Tommy Lipuma (on my left) and Jazz great McCoy Tyner on my right. The dinner was memorable, but I have no memory of the food. I spent my time listening to the stories Tyner told, including some during his time with Coltrane’s “Classic Quartet” (he left the group in 1965.) All in all it was a magical evening. In 1998 I left the jazz label, but not jazz.

 

     A few years ago I discovered a jazz station with its own iPhone app. The station goes by the name “TSF Jazz” (www.tsfjazz.com). It’s a French station in most ways: its programming comes from Paris and most of the on-air voices speak only French. But the music they play is steeped in classic American Jazz. So you’ll be listening to a set of 2 or 3 recordings, say Louis Armstrong or Miles Davis, and the announcer will tell you “Que Wass Louis Armstrong avec ‘Saint James Infirmary'”. (Understand, my French is passable only in restaurants, so I offer this translation: “That was Louis Armstrong with ‘St. James Infirmary’”). I highly recommend the station and the app.

 

     Last month I had time to visit our daughter in Marina Bay (next door to Richmond in the East Bay). My second day there I realized I had been listening to KCSM radio in her home and car. She’s become a bit of a fan of this Bay-area jazz station. It’s a rarity these days to find a 24-hour jazz station but happily, San Francisco and surrounding communities seem to support this oasis for jazz lovers, and those simply wishing to escape anything else, even if only for  few hours here and there.

 

     Traveling further north into Mendocino County, the only station offering thoughtful, informed, and highly listenable jazz is KZYX. There are multiple programmers who each, happily, bring a personal (and informed) approach to the music they play. Most of the programs have alternating hosts, as on Sunday nights with Jim Heid, Fred Adler (yes, Gualala’s own), and Dave Barre sharing the two-hour time slot. Monday afternoon veteran writer and jazz lover Jerry Karp and talented musician Jon Solow alternate holding the 2:00pm time slot. Thursday morning Ron Hoffar and Toby Gleason do a similar balance of jazz ‘yin and yang’. Other programmers dabble in jazz, occasionally incorporating the genre into their music programs but the focused effort is found in those 6 hours.

 

     If radio and recordings are not your thing, you’ll be happy to learn that during the past 4-5 years, live jazz has found an increasing fan base in Mendocino County. My neighbor and friend Harrison Goldberg is an amazing musician, usually embracing his favored instrument, the alto sax. By seeing Harrison perform, I’ve also met musicians Chris Doering, Dave Jordan, Tim Mueller, Dorian May, Dorothea May, Charlie Vally, Gabe Yanez, and the fusion ensemble BAKU:  Harrison Goldberg, saxophones and percussion, Chris Doering, 7-string guitar and guitar synthesizer, Tim Mueller, 6-string guitar and guitar synthesizer, David French, upright bass and percussion, and Nancy Feehan, cajon and percussion.

 

     Mendocino has attracted all sorts of creative people. Perhaps there’s some faintly heard siren call luring them all here. Maybe it’s simply serendipity. Whatever the reason, a solid group of musicians and a group of fans have been drawn here. From the Russian River to Point Arena—and beyond, live music and ready listeners have embraced each other.

 

     Music can be heard regularly at the Timber Cove Inn, the Sea Ranch Lodge, Annapolis Winery, Mendoviné, 215 Main, St. Orres, and Arena Theater. It’s no accident that the annual Gualala Arts Whale & Jazz Festival keeps the talent coming as well, as they’ve helped develop a space for more than art and sculpture, but also for terrific music. And if you’re traveling even further north, there’s the Sequoia Room at North Coast Brewing’s Tap Room Restaurant in Fort Bragg. The Sequoia Room is a 60-seat venue, offered as a gift to music lovers from the founders of North Coast Brewing. Most weekends the Sequoia Room features some of the best players traveling the club circuit, and their website boasts a couple of hundred names, all of whom have performed there.

 

     Whether you want to travel a few miles or 60 to hear some great music, why not do it while you’re here? Look through this issue of the Lighthouse Peddler; you’ll find some of the players cited above performing this month, and what better place or time to hear live music than here and now.

 

David Steffen, Published in the July Lighthouse Peddler
©2018 David Steffen

Old Shoes: The Value of Things   Leave a comment

November 1, 2017

 

I have a pair of Cole-Haan loafers that I swear are the most comfortable shoes I’ve ever worn. Dennis, our local shoe-repair expert appreciates the shoes far more than anyone in my family. He once asked how long I’ve had them. I quietly whispered “well I bought them in 1988.” I think he liked the idea that I was still wearing them, and I’m grateful he continues to bring them back from the dead every few years. What about you? How Shoes IMG_0341about that pair of comfortable (and tattered) slippers you continue to wear? Or that ratty shirt? Things that bring us some measure of personal comfort are not to be lightly dismissed. Which brings me to public radio. Sometimes it feels as if public radio is like those old shoes of mine. Eminently comfortable.
I met then KZYX GM Belinda Rawlins in 2007 and was surprised to find myself working for her a year later. Me, in public radio. But it was stimulating, since KZYX was not a mega station (like KQED in San Francisco) but a truly local idea. Some national content, yet the majority of the programs then and now created by people right here in Mendocino County. And like the county itself, the local programs seem born of the towns, roads, hills, valleys, and rivers; reflecting the wide breadth of taste, interests, and topicality.
As a listener, we’re comfortable that Morning Edition turns up every morning, or that Terry Gross brings us a bit of Fresh Air every day. And we take for granted a group of almost 100 dedicated (and unpaid) volunteers who create local programs of local interest; friends and neighbors talking about their vegetable gardens, or bringing us a local view on politics, or food, or the environment. There’s music for every taste, from almost every genre (well no barbershop quartets. . . .) They do this for the pride and love of what they’re doing, and for the audience.
It may be difficult to acknowledge but far too many of us take public radio for granted. After all, ‘it gets tons of money from the federal government’ (untrue), ‘it costs nothing to operate’ (also untrue), or ‘everyone else pays for it so I don’t need to.’ This last idea is interesting because in reality, only one-in-ten listeners contributes to public radio. Line up ten random public radio listeners from the Mendonoma coast and the odds are you’ll find that only one of them supports a public station with a financial contribution. There are some essential qualities required to work in public radio. For example, you must be self-motivated, willing to work long and weird hours (often at the same time), and believe in what your doing. You might accept that those traits apply to every job, and perhaps they do. But one of the realities of public radio is the fact that the wolf is regularly at the door. Not always, but he makes an appearance once or twice every year, so everyone understands that public radio is fragile, always a little on the edge.  But we love it and believe it’s worth the long hours, the modest pay, and the angst. We all learn to perform a myriad of jobs at a station like KZYX. I’m ostensibly working on the business side, but on any given day at any time I often find myself in the studio helping out on the air. Or answering the phones. Or cleaning the station’s bathroom; or picking up a volunteer who’s stranded on highway 253 halfway to Ukiah. You name the job, and every staffer has done it at one time or another, and continues to do so. And so it was on the evening of Sunday, October 8.
Our Sunday night volunteer programmer began receiving calls from listeners about a fire in or near Redwood Valley. Anyone and everyone who called in to the studio late that night spoke with Bob, who then passed along the anecdotal information to the rest of the listeners. I emphasize ‘anecdotal’ because there were few official reports available. By Fire XMTR 2 22310605_10154962401007967_7592346504480456810_nMonday morning many of us were at the Philo studios providing non-stop information to our listeners. Some time that morning Jeffrey Parker, the station’s General Manager, created a shared online document enabling all of us to add information as we received updates by email, internet, text, and calls from the sheriff, police, highway patrol, volunteer fire departments, Cal-Fire, officials throughout Mendocino, Lake, or Sonoma County, and our listeners. Our news people were shuttling between locations on either side of Highway 101, gathering information from Laytonville to Hopland. And we heard from local residents who wanted to share details gleaned from conversations with local authorities. At one point that shared document of information ran more than twenty pages, totaled almost 3000 words, and enabled us to get fresh information to our listeners quickly.
As the days passed we knew that, absent an unexpected rain shower, this fire was going to be with us for another week or more. Every volunteer programmer (and the paid staff) took time every hour (and sometimes more often) to get the information out. Fire XMTR 3 22366841_10154962401507967_8710817202782215739_nNumerous people contacted us on a borrowed phone or by email to tell us their stories. Some cell networks weren’t working, yet some landlines remained active. Internet access was beginning to disappear in many areas, whether it was via satellite dish or cable. Then it got real scary. We were receiving multiple reports of (and from) people who were in the midst of preparing to leave their homes for safer areas, who turned toward the edge of their property and realized they were now out of time. They jumped into their car or truck or bus and hightailed it toward what they hoped would be safer ground. This fire was devouring grasslands, woodlands, sheds, storage facilities, homes, farms, and commercial businesses. Everything and anything in the way was likely to be damaged or destroyed. Over almost two weeks, our staff and volunteers stayed at it. At this writing, the fires are now contained or completely extinguished, but the devastation and rebuilding of lives and property begins.

That two weeks of manic efforts on everyone’s part is exactly what public radio is about. Serving everyone in our listening area, not just our members. It’s worth keeping that in mind as we consider just how public radio can be supported. We were fortunate that there was no major damage to the station; the fire came oh so very close to one of the KZYX transmitters but fortunately there was very little apparent damage to the station’s equipment. That’s in stark contrast to the obvious devastation throughout northern California. Everyone affected will need help. And along the way, if you can consider throwing some money toward your local public radio station, that might be a good idea as well.

David Steffen

© 2017 David Steffen
top: those shoes…..
middle: fires across Redwood Valley
bottom: transmitter site.

 

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